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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
: speaking of political mess, both sides have what they say are opening gambits on the table. president obama at least his last week which calls for $1.6 trillion in revenues. the republicans came back with their own yesterday. as you looked at each approach, what do you see in that? >> well, i think it's important. i think the reporting has been a little weak on the republican plan. it isn't really a plan. they're claiming $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction but the specifics they've actually laid out such as they have are only about $300 billion. the rest of it is all vapor ware. claims that they will close loopholes. they won't say what. claims they will cut spending but they don't say how. the republican plan is actually just a smoke screen. there's nothing real there. the obama plan is a very good, very sensible plan. which as we know as very little chance of taking place in its current form. at least it's a real plan. we know what it is he's proposing to do. >> ifill: among the critics of his plan are those who say that it doesn't do anything or speak at all to the economy of entitlement
a week's hiatus we are told there were no signs of progress and even a hardening of positions. in fact, earlier president obama discussed the stalemate with middle-class families. >> for them to be burdened unnecessarily because the democrats and republicans aren't coming together to solve this problem gives you a since of the costs involved in very personal terms. >> he showed what he is really after is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> the major sticking points continue to be how to handle tax rates for wealthy americans, and also, what to do about reducing spending on entitlement programs like social security and medica medicare. >> aide between the president and the speaker of the house met and the talks basically went nowhere. according to one of the president's aide he said higher taxes of course on the wealthy. a deal must include permanent extension of the debt ceiling and source also say that indicated no willingness to go any further on limiting the growth of entitlement spending. >> bottom line. entitlement spending is 60% of
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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